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23 customer journey metrics your business needs to track

Karthik MSN
~ 7 min read | Published on Feb 07, 2024





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When it comes to running a successful business, understanding your customers' journey is crucial. By tracking key metrics at each stage of the customer journey, you can gain valuable insights that will help you improve your product management and marketing strategies, enhance the customer experience, and drive profitability.

Customer journey metrics provide valuable data that allows you to assess the effectiveness of your acquisition, activation, engagement, retention, referral and monetization strategies. From the moment a customer hears about your product to the point where they become loyal advocates, tracking these metrics will enable you to make data-driven decisions and optimize every step of the customer journey.

In this article, we will explore 23 essential customer journey metrics that your business needs to track. By consistently monitoring these metrics, you can identify areas for improvement, uncover opportunities for growth, and ensure that you are delivering a seamless experience to your customers from start to finish.

Key Takeaways:

  • Tracking customer journey metrics is vital for improving your product management and marketing strategies.
  • Metrics at each stage of the customer journey provide valuable insights for optimization.
  • Consistently monitoring these metrics allows you to make data-driven decisions and enhance the customer experience.
  • By tracking customer journey metrics, you can identify areas for improvement and uncover opportunities for growth.
  • Delivering a seamless experience to your customers from start to finish is essential for driving profitability.

Stage 1: Acquisition

The first stage of the customer journey is acquisition, where businesses focus on attracting new users to their product or service. It is crucial to measure key customer journey metrics in this stage to evaluate the effectiveness of acquisition strategies and identify areas for improvement. Let's explore the important metrics to track during this stage.

Time-to-Activation

One essential customer journey metric to measure during the acquisition stage is the time-to-activation. This metric indicates how quickly users can start using the product or service after acquisition. By tracking the time-to-activation, businesses can identify any bottlenecks or barriers that delay user onboarding, allowing them to streamline the process and improve the overall user experience.

Number of Visiting Users

Another crucial customer journey metric to monitor during the acquisition stage is the number of users. This metric helps businesses gauge the reach and impact of their acquisition efforts. By tracking the number of users visiting from different channels, businesses can identify which channels are driving the most traffic and allocate resources accordingly. It also provides insights into the growth of the user base over time.

Cost of Inbound Traffic

The cost of inbound traffic is a significant customer journey metric to consider during the acquisition stage. It measures the expenses incurred in attracting users to the product or service. By tracking the cost of inbound traffic, businesses can evaluate the efficiency of their acquisition campaigns and optimize their marketing budget allocation. It helps them identify cost-effective acquisition channels and adjust strategies to maximize return on investment.

Metric

Definition

Importance

Time-to-Activation

Measures how quickly users can start using the product or service after acquisition.

Identifies onboarding bottlenecks and improves user experience.

Number of Users

Tracks the quantity of users visiting from different channels.

Evaluates acquisition reach and growth of the user base.

Cost of Inbound Traffic

Measures the expenses incurred in attracting users to the product or service.

Optimizes marketing budget allocation and identifies cost-effective acquisition channels.

 

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Stage 2: Activation

The second stage in the customer journey is Activation, where the focus shifts to getting new users to register and start interacting with your product or service. This stage is critical for establishing a strong foundation for ongoing user engagement. Below are the key customer journey metrics that businesses should track during the Activation stage to ensure effective user onboarding and early engagement.

Number of Users Who Sign Up/Create Profile

A primary metric in the Activation stage is the number of users who sign up or create a profile. This metric serves as a direct indicator of the initial interest and commitment level of new users in the context of customer journey metrics. By monitoring sign-up rates, businesses can assess the effectiveness of their onboarding processes and identify opportunities to optimize user experience. This metric also helps in understanding the conversion rate from casual visitors to registered users in terms of customer journey metrics.

User Conversion Rate

User conversion rate is a vital metric in this stage, measuring the percentage of visitors who take a significant action like registering or subscribing. This metric is essential for evaluating the effectiveness of the user interface and the overall appeal of the product or service in the context of customer journey metrics. A high conversion rate typically indicates that the product aligns well with user needs and expectations, while a low rate may signal the need for improvements in onboarding and user experience.

Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC)

Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC) is a crucial financial metric in the Activation stage in the context of customer journey metrics. It calculates the total cost spent on acquiring a new customer, including all marketing and sales expenses. Keeping track of CAC helps businesses understand the investment required to attract each customer and is key for evaluating the sustainability and scalability of acquisition strategies. An optimal CAC should be balanced against the lifetime value of a customer to ensure long-term profitability in the context of customer journey metrics.

Daily Active Users (DAU)

Daily Active Users (DAU) is a crucial metric in the Activation stage of the customer journey. DAU measures the number of users who interact with your product or service on a daily basis. It indicates the daily engagement level of your user base and provides insights into how frequently users find value in your product. A high DAU suggests that your product is an integral part of users' daily routines, and they regularly return for interaction. Monitoring DAU helps assess the stickiness of your product and its ability to retain users on a daily basis.

Monthly Active Users (MAU)

Monthly Active Users (MAU) is another vital metric in the Activation stage. MAU measures the number of users who engage with your product or service at least once in a month. It provides a broader view of user engagement over a longer timeframe compared to DAU. MAU is important for understanding the overall reach and retention of your user base. A growing MAU indicates sustained interest in your product, while a declining MAU may signal the need for re-engagement strategies. Monitoring MAU helps assess the health and growth of your user community over a monthly period.

Stage 3: Engagement

Engagement is the third stage of the customer journey, focusing on how users interact with your product or service after they have signed up. This stage is crucial for understanding the value users derive from your product and for fostering a deeper connection with them. Monitoring engagement metrics is essential for identifying how well the product meets user needs and for driving improvements. Let's delve into the key metrics to track during this stage.

Length of Engagement

The Length of Engagement metric measures the duration of time users spend interacting with your product. This metric is vital for assessing the stickiness and attractiveness of your product. Longer engagement times often indicate that users find value in your product, which can lead to increased loyalty and higher chances of conversion to paying customers. Tracking this metric helps in understanding user behavior patterns and in identifying features that keep users engaged for extended periods.

Depth of Engagement

Depth of Engagement refers to the level of user interaction within your product, like likes, comments, shares, etc. This metric goes beyond mere usage and looks at how users are interacting with various features of your product. High depth of engagement is a strong indicator of a product's ability to resonate with its users on a deeper level. It is essential for understanding which aspects of your product are most appealing and engaging to your user base.

Frequency of Engagement

Frequency of Engagement tracks the number of times users interact with your product over a given period, such as daily or weekly. This metric is crucial for understanding how integral your product is in the users' daily lives. Regular interaction suggests a habit-forming product that has become a part of the user’s routine. Analyzing frequency patterns can help in identifying peak usage times and in tailoring marketing efforts to boost engagement during these periods.

Weekly Engagement Over Total Weekly Active Users

This metric compares the number of users who are engaged in a given week with the total number of active users in that week. It provides a ratio that helps in understanding what proportion of your user base is actively engaged with your product. A higher ratio indicates a more engaged user base, which can be a significant driver for growth and retention. It's a critical metric for evaluating the effectiveness of engagement strategies and for making data-driven decisions to enhance user engagement.

Metric

Description

Length of Engagement

Measures the time spent using the product

Depth of Engagement

Captures likes, comments, and other interactive actions

Frequency of Engagement

Measures the number of sessions per day or week

Weekly Engagement Users over Total Weekly Active Users

Calculates the ratio of engaged users to the total active user base

 

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Stage 4: Retention

Retention is the fourth stage in the customer journey, emphasizing the ongoing engagement and loyalty of users with your product or service. This stage is pivotal for sustaining long-term relationships with users and ensuring continuous value delivery. Effective retention strategies lead to a stable user base and lower churn rates. Here are the essential metrics to monitor in the Retention stage.

Stickiness Ratio (DAU/MAU)

The Stickiness Ratio, calculated as Daily Active Users (DAU) divided by Monthly Active Users (MAU), is a key metric in measuring retention. It provides insights into how often users return to your product within a month. A higher stickiness ratio indicates that users are consistently engaging with your product, signaling strong user retention and a product that's become a habitual part of users' lives. Monitoring this metric helps in understanding the long-term engagement trends and the health of the user base.

7-Day Active Users (L7)

7-Day Active Users (L7) is a metric used in the Retention stage of the customer journey. L7 measures the number of users who return to your product or service within a 7-day period. It provides insights into short-term user retention, indicating how effectively your product can re-engage users within a week of their last interaction. A high L7 count suggests that your product retains users on a relatively short-term basis, which can be important for maintaining ongoing interest and usage.

28-Day Active Users (L28)

28-Day Active Users (L28) is a metric also used in the Retention stage. L28 measures the number of users who return to your product or service within a 28-day period. It provides insights into medium-term user retention, indicating how well your product can sustain user interest over a longer timeframe. A strong L28 count suggests that your product remains relevant and engaging to users even after several weeks. Monitoring L28 helps businesses understand the retention dynamics over a more extended period and make adjustments to keep users coming back.

Three Times Weekly Active Users (3Dw)

The 3Dw metric counts users who return to the product at least three times in one week. It's a significant indicator of a highly engaging product, where users frequently interact multiple times within a week. A strong 3Dw metric suggests that the product is not only retaining users but is also integral to their weekly routine.

User Churn Rate

User Churn Rate measures the percentage of users who stop using the product over a specific period. It's crucial for understanding the rate at which you're losing users. A lower churn rate is desirable, indicating high user satisfaction and effective retention strategies. Tracking churn rate is essential for identifying potential issues in the product or user experience and for implementing timely measures to retain users.

Stage 5: Referral

Referral is the fifth stage in the customer journey, focusing on users who are not only satisfied with your product but also enthusiastic enough to recommend it to others. Referral marketing can have a powerful impact on growth and user acquisition. This stage is all about leveraging your existing user base to drive additional traffic and engagement. Let's explore the key metrics to track during the Referral stage.

Number of Shares/Public Posts

Tracking the number of shares and public posts related to your product is a critical metric in the Referral stage. When users willingly share their positive experiences with your product on social media or other platforms, it generates word-of-mouth marketing. High numbers of shares and public posts indicate that your product has a strong advocate base that is actively promoting it to a broader audience.

Referral Code-Based Registration

Referral code-based registration is a direct metric for measuring the success of referral programs. It tracks the number of new users acquired through referral codes provided by existing users. This metric not only gauges the effectiveness of your referral program but also reflects the level of trust and satisfaction among your user base. A growing number of registrations through referrals is a sign of a healthy referral ecosystem.

Referral programs often include incentives for both the referrer and the new user, which can further drive referrals and reward loyal users for their advocacy.

Stage 6: Revenue

Revenue or Monetization is the final stage in the customer journey, where the focus shifts to generating revenue from your user base. This stage is critical for businesses seeking sustainable profitability and growth. Effective monetization strategies ensure that your product or service provides value not only to users but also to the business. Let's explore the key metrics to track during the Monetization stage.

Average Revenue Per User (ARPU)

Average Revenue Per User (ARPU) is a fundamental financial metric in the Monetization stage. It calculates the average revenue generated from each individual user over a specific period. ARPU provides insights into the revenue potential of your user base and helps in evaluating the effectiveness of your pricing strategies, upselling, and cross-selling efforts. Monitoring ARPU helps businesses ensure that they are extracting sufficient value from their users.

Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR)

Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR) is a critical metric for subscription-based businesses. It measures the predictable, recurring revenue generated from subscription plans on a monthly basis. MRR provides financial stability and is essential for forecasting and long-term planning. Tracking MRR helps businesses assess the health of their subscription model and evaluate the impact of pricing changes or new offerings.

Annual Recurring Revenue (ARR)

Annual Recurring Revenue (ARR) extends the concept of MRR to an annual timeframe. It measures the predictable, recurring revenue generated from annual subscriptions. ARR provides a broader view of revenue stability and is particularly important for businesses with annual billing cycles. Tracking ARR helps in understanding the long-term revenue outlook and identifying opportunities for growth.

User Lifetime Value (LTV)

User Lifetime Value (LTV) is a comprehensive metric that calculates the total revenue expected from a user throughout their entire lifecycle with your product or service. It takes into account not only the initial acquisition and subscription revenue but also the potential for upsells, renewals, and additional purchases over time. LTV is a critical metric for understanding the long-term impact of your users on your business's profitability and sustainability.

The Monetization stage is where businesses translate user engagement into revenue, ensuring the sustainability and growth of their operations. By monitoring these metrics, companies can optimize their monetization strategies, refine pricing models, and maximize the value they derive from their user base.

More resources on Customer Journey Metrics

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Why are customer journey metrics important in product management and marketing strategies?

customer journey metrics is a map that shows us how people use and feel about a product or service. In product management and marketing, understanding this journey is like having a guide to what works well and what doesn't. These metrics tell us about the steps a user takes, from first hearing about the product to becoming a loyal user. By looking at this information, companies can make better decisions about how to improve their products and marketing strategies to meet users' needs and make them happier. This makes the business more focused on its users, which can lead to more success.

What metrics should be tracked in the acquisition stage?

In the beginning, when we're trying to attract new users, it's important to keep an eye on a few key customer journey metrics. We should look at how quickly new users start to actively use the product, which tells us if the starting process is smooth. This customer journey metric is crucial for understanding user onboarding efficiency. It's also good to know where these users are coming from, so we know which of our marketing efforts are working best. Plus, understanding how much it costs to bring in these users helps us manage our budget better. Keeping track of these customer journey metrics helps us make smarter decisions about how to get more users effectively..

What metrics should be measured during the activation stage?

During the activation stage, when users are starting to use the product, we need to focus on how many people are signing up and actually starting to use it. It's important to see how much it costs to get each new user and how active these users are, like how many people are using the product every day or month. This information helps us assess if our efforts to get users started are working well in the context of customer journey metrics or if we need to make the process more appealing.

What metrics should be analyzed to evaluate user engagement?

To understand how engaged users are with our product, we look at how long they spend with it, how often they come back, and how much they interact with it, like commenting or liking features. These details help us gauge how much value users are getting from our product in terms of customer journey metrics and how connected they feel to it. By monitoring these aspects through the lens of customer journey metrics, we can work on making our product more interesting and enjoyable for users, encouraging them to use it more often.

How can businesses track user retention?

For tracking how well we keep users over time, we focus on a few key customer journey metrics. The "stickiness ratio," which compares daily users to monthly users, shows us how regularly people are using our product in the context of customer journey metrics. The churn rate, or how many users stop using the product, helps us understand what might be turning users away. Also, looking at how many users come back after a certain period gives us insight into when and why users might leave, so we can find ways to keep them interested, mainly the number of users who come back within a 7-day period (L7), a 28-day period (L28), or three times in one week (3Dw) should be under one’s eye in the context of customer journey metrics.

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